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Topics - Randall Sadler

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1
General Questions / youtube test
« on: January 22, 2014, 04:04:28 PM »

2
Funny or Cool Stuff / A Great Deal on a HUGE harddrive???
« on: April 27, 2010, 09:26:01 AM »
Greetings all,

If you think computers are expensive now...take a look at the Advertisement attached below (click the image to expand)!!  My best guess is that this ad is from the late 1970s or early 1980s.

For sake of comparison, that HD--10 megs for $3,398 equates to $340 per megabyte.

An ad today via the website Newegg.com had one Terrabyte Hardrives for $79.99.
One Terrabyte is equal to 1,048,576 Megabytes, which means that this hard drive costs $.000076/megabyte.


4
Since Virtual Worlds like Second Life can be very "hands on" they can be an ideal space for Task-Based Language Learning Activities.  This exercise asks the participants to build something in Second Life.  After giving the students a tutorial on building, they are asked to create "something."  That item could be art, furniture, a flower, a car--anything they can imagine.  As you'll see in the attached instructions (soon to come) the only requirement is that their creation include at least 7 parts (prims) and 5 colors or textures.  Each group is sent to a different area to work on the build.

In stage 1, the students, who I have work in groups of 3,  must engage in a great deal of communication and negotiation while brainstorming their design and building the object.  In addition, part of the assignment is for the groups to take detailed notes and to create a set of detailed instructions for how to build their creation.

In stage two of the project, the groups exchange those instructions, and then each group must try to recreate the creation of another group, solely based on the instructions (remember, they created in different areas, so they've not seen each other's builds). 

In stage three, everyone comes together in Second Life, having given the instructor copies of their creations.  The instructor then takes out the originals, and then, one-by-one, the recreations.  Usually there is some great laughter since some of of the recreations are very close, and others are waaaayyy off.

In stage four, the groups should revise their instructions based on the feedback from their classmates.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++
My questions for the other users of the forum.  Based on my description, and the instructions attached, what language lessons can students learn from this activity?  Also, what other ideas/extensions can you make based on this idea???

Thanks for any suggestions you can give!!!!!!

5
Educational Activities / Scavenger Hunt
« on: February 02, 2009, 02:16:12 PM »
One of the most popular activities for new learners in a virtual world is a Scavenger Hunt.  This one was designed for use in Second Life, but would be easily modified for use elsewhere!  In the attachments you'll find:
1.  The rules for the hunt
2.  Tips for doing things in SL that are required for the hunt
3.  The Scavenger Hunt.

I find that this type of activity is a great way to begin the exploration of a VW, but it can also have clear educational implications.  It requires communication among the teams (I usually have the students work in groups of 2-3), and depending on how you structure it, you can require the teams to produce written descriptions, talk to other avatars to gain information for the hunt etc.

I'd love it if people would share their own ideas in replies. 

6
Language Exchange Site Links / The Mixer--language exchange site
« on: March 25, 2008, 11:57:59 AM »
Site set up via a university for language exchanges for students or classes.

From the website:  The Mixxer is a free educational community for language learners and teachers to find a language partner for a language exchange. The language partner is someone who speaks the language you study as their native language and is studying your native language. The partners then meet online to help each other practice and learn a foreign language.

http://www.language-exchanges.org/

7
You'll notice that most podcasts that are of a good quality make use of music--sometimes for the intro and conclusion, but also sometimes just as background.  Here are some sites where you can get paid, royalty free and/or podcast safe music.


http://www.mp3.com/free-music/?tag=topnav;freemusic

http://www.opsound.org/index.php
A community of musicians who make their music available for free

http://www.opsound.org/index.php
Lots of podcast safe music

http://freeplaymusic.com/
The name does say it--free to play, but not free to use in a podcast.  Still, great music!

http://www.freesound.org/
Need a sound?  Almost any sound?  This is the place, and totally free.

8
Hello all,

If you are taking my course on Computer-Mediated Communication and Language Teaching, please follow the link below to take a survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=mCmsmMspik_2bAKcvUGvxeIA_3d_3d

See the responses from the survey here:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/sr.aspx?sm=Udl0qNPoVD47IqFW8mWWjihhI1gvrzi87vm_2fbIS7qew_3d

9
Having music with your podcast or vidcast is great, but where can you find it.....legally?  Here are some sources:

Podsafe Audio
http://www.podsafeaudio.com

Podsafe Music Network
http://music.podshow.com

Podshow
http://www.podshow.com

Peoplesound
http://www.peoplesound.com

10
Hello all,

So, you like podcasts, and you've decided to jump right in and create you own?  Excellent!  Below you'll find some guides.  First, you'll find a couple guides for creating a podcast the "hard" way, which means doing everything (pretty much) on your own.  Following these, you'll find the "easy" way--which I recommend!   ;)

How to create a podcast from scratch--the hard way
http://radio.about.com/od/podcastin1/a/aa030805a.htm


Where to host your files
If you do traditonal podcasting, you need to host your audio and/or video files on server space somewhere.  Don't have your own?  No problem. 
Our Media
http://www.ourmedia.org/

Podcasting the Easy Way (or at least easier!)
Blogger--with a Blogger account you can link to your own audio files, but you will need to host the files somewhere--see above
http://www.blogger.com

Podomatic:  Podomatic allows you to create you own podcast, and you can even record directly via their webpage!  I do recommend, however, that you use Audacity and then upload it, as the quality will be much higher.
http://www.podomatic.com

Podbean: Podbean is a podcasting site that also allows you to attach Word or .pdf files, which is a great asset for creating educational podcasts.
http://www.podbean.com/

Liberated Syndication (good, but not free)
http://www.libsyn.com

11
Hello all,

As you know, podcasting is very popular, and becoming more so in Education all the time.  Here are a few links you may find useful on the topic:

iTunes--If you don't have this on your computer, consider it.  Wonderful tool for audio podcasts.
http://www.apple.com/itunes/download/

Want to find a podcast?

iTunes Store--Of course you can buy music, etc. here, but this is also a very good directory for free podcasts.
http://www.apple.com/itunes/store/

Open Culture language lessons section
http://www.openculture.com/freelanguagelessons

Podcast Alley
http://www.podcastalley.com

http://www.digitalpodcast.com/


Some Popular Aggretators

Bloglines
http://www.bloglines.com

Google Reader
http://www.[url=http://www.google.com/reader]www.google.com/reader[/url]

Feedly
http://www.feedly.com

Newsgator
http://www.newsgator.com

Podcasting News:  A big list of Aggregators
http://www.podcastingnews.com/topics/Podcast_Software.html


12
Here are some wiki related sites:

http://www.wikipedia.org
The big one

http://MediaWiki.org
The open source software that runs wikipedia

http://en.wikibooks.org/
An associated project that focuses on the creation of open source "books"

http://www.pbworks.com
As easy as a peanut butter sandwic

http://www.wikispaces.com
Another great free wiki space

http://www.pmichaud.com/wiki/PmWiki/PmWiki
PmWiki

http://twiki.org/
This one used by many businesses

Wiki comparison tools:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_wiki_software
A wiki software comparison...on a wiki!

http://www.wikimatrix.org/
Another comparison--this one allows you to choose which ones to compare.


13
Here are links to some sites where you can make your own blog!

http://www.blogger.com
Blogger is now owned by Google and is one of the most popular blog tools

http://www.xanga.com/
Another very popular blogging site

http://wordpress.com/

http://www.podomatic.com
This service is a very nice combination of a traditional blog with easy uploading of sound and video files--nice!

And here are some actual blogs that relate to TESOL

http://iteslj.org/links/TESL/Weblogs/
A huge list of ESL related blogs--provided by hatime!


http://blogs.thelinguist.com/
English learning tips from a linguist


http://www.learnoutloud.com/Podcast-Directory/Languages/English-as-a-Second-Language/The-Daily-Idiom-Podcast/5628#listen
The daily idiom podcast


14
A WOO is a Web-enhanced MOO, which means that it is much more graphically oriented.  Sometimes these are called GMUKs (Graphical Multiuser Konversations).  Most often, these are used more for entertainment rather than education, depending on just how graphically oriented they are.   One popular WOO worth looking at is called Active Worlds, located at:

http://www.activeworlds.com

As you'll see, this site provides you with multiple worlds to explore.

Unfortunately, you'll discover that it also requires a download onto your computer to operate, which means that you might not be able to use it in a lab environment.   :'(

15
Here are some quick directions for getting to the telnet version of schMOOze University.  This uses telnet, just like the British Legends MUD posted in this section as well.  What the heck is telnet?  Telnet is an old style interface to connect to the Internet in the pre browser days.  It still almost certain exists on your computer if you use Windows.  Do this:
1.  go to your start button and click on it.
2.  Click on the "run" button.
3.  Type in the address for schMOOze University:  telnet schmooze.hunter.cuny.edu 8888 
4.  Click okay

Now the telnet screen should pop up with a funky black screen with white letters--WELCOME to the old school of the Internet!   8) 8)

5.  Follow the instructions by typing "connect guest"
6.  Type in your name and description
7.  Type "classroom" to go to the classroom to learn basic commands.

Explore!

Schmooze U. later also developed a much more MOOish java enable site:  http://schmooze.hunter.cuny.edu/

16
Here is a link to the "original" MUD (well, sort of), and it is still alive and active today:

To access it via telnet, click on the start button on your computer, click on "run" and put this in the window:

telnet://british-legends.com:27750

or go to the website shown below and under "play the game" click on "other ways to play" and follow the instructions

http://www.british-legends.com/

This type of MUD was designed as a "Dungeons and Dragons" style enviromnent--hence the name MUD--Multi User Dungeon.  The idea was to explore the world that the Dungeon Master had created, try go get treasure, perhaps fight with other players, and generally act like a thoroughly studly nerd!  Give it a try!  As you'll see, it is totally textual in nature, and it requires that you pay attention and, as is often done, create your own map (real, not virtual) of the dungeon as you explore it.  That way you will remember your way around.

A Very Brief History--very slightly modified from this website:  http://www.mudconnect.com/mud_intro.html
The first mud was created by Roy Trubshaw and Richard Bartle at Essex University in 1979 (for those interested, the now obsolete predecessor to the C language, BCPL was used for development, with some assembly language routines used). The original version merely allowed a user (player) to move about in a virtual location, later versions provided for more variation including objects and commands which could be modified on or offline. The goal for developing the first MUD was to test a newly developed shared memory system, the gaming aspect came later.

In 1980 Richard Bartle took over with development. For a more detailed description of these events please visit Richard Bartle's Mud Site http://www.mud.co.uk/richard/mud.htm. Additionally, The MUDdex, created by Lauren P. Burka includes an email written by Richard Bartle to clear up common misconceptions about the beginnings of MUDs. http://www.linnaean.org/~lpb/muddex/

Note: The original MUD1 still survives, but no longer runs under the name 'British Legends' at Compuserve. MUD1 has been revived by Viktor T. Toth and is now available at http://www.british-legends.com/. This version is not an update of MUD1, but a faithful port that accurately reproduces all aspects of the original, even including most of the bugs.

If you are looking for a detailed graphical history of mud servers check out Martin Keegan's The Mud Tree. The page illustrates the hierarchy and relationships of the majority of mud servers and is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the history of muds.


17
Please reply to this message with your video related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

Also, follow the link below for a sample of a simple video edit using Windows Movie Maker, some sound files, and Audacity.   :D

Dr Bishop office hours 0001





Here is a second example of the use of video--this time a vodcast by yours truly:

Podcasts and Reading Classes

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Please reply to this message with your audio telefony related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

19
Please reply to this message with your text chat related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

20
Please reply to this message with your Wiki related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

21
Please reply to this message with your Blog related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

22
Please reply to this message with your MUD, MOO, or WOO related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

Be sure to check out Rachel's Super List of MOOs, which lists over 150, including a number that are language related

http://moolist.yeehaw.net/index.html

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Please reply to this message with your Message Board related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

24
Please reply to this message with your email related links.  When you post the link, please tell us what the link is for.  Make it a bit like a mini critical review (see the "Critical Reviews of Technology" topic on the main page).  In other words, don't just post a link and say "check it out!"  Instead, tell us about the link.  Is it for a product, a website, a research paper?  How could you use it for CMC language learning?  We look forward to seeing you links!!

25
In an earlier post, Julieta Fernandez offered "8 Ways to Get Students Engaged in Online Discussion."  She found these at the URL indicated at the bottom of her message.  Obviously, getting students engaged and motivated in the CMC process is really key in making it successful.  Please take a look at the 8 items below.  First, do you agree with them?

Second, and perhaps more important, what should be added and/or subtracted from this list?


8 Ways to Get Students Engaged in Online Discussion

1) Require Participation:   Donít let it be optional. Set aside a portion of the grade allocation for quantity and quality of participation in the online discussion.

2) Form Learning Teams:   Collaborative learning can occur just as well in the online environment. Asynchronous conferencing via discussion boards overcomes the schedule coordination issues that often plague face-to-face teams.

3) Make the Activity Interesting:   Make it relevant so that students will want to participate. Challenge students to apply what they are learning.

4) Donít Settle for Opinions:   Encourage rigorous analysis and creative thought. Instructors should insist that opinions must be supported with data or evidence.

5) Structure the Activity:   Organize topics around course objectives. Structure provides guideposts to help students think of things to contribute.

6) Require a Hand-In Assignment (Deliverable):   Deliverables could include idea generation and analysis, decisions, plans and designs, proposals, case studies, problem generation and solution, research projects, term papers or reports.

7) Know What You are Looking for and Involve Yourself to Help Make It Happen:   Participate in the discussion. When you offer feedback, encouragement, and direction, students will become more involved.

8. Implement Peer Review and Grading:   This can be a great way to encourage quality work. Be sure to provide students with appropriate evaluation criteria.

From Fall 2003 ITC Topics
Retrieved February 13th, 05 from: http://itc.utk.edu/teaching/principles/cooperation.shtml

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