Author Topic: Peer-Review  (Read 1582 times)

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Offline Yeonjae Lee

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Peer-Review
« on: April 06, 2015, 04:24:54 PM »
Here is a link to a peer review response form that I found:
https://my.hamilton.edu/documents//nesbitt-johnston-writing-center/Peer%20Review%20Response%20Form.pdf
I like some aspects of it, especially the first part which includes a sort of written conversation or dialogue between the author and the peer-reviewer.

My own peer review response form, adapted from the above link, would probably look more like this:

1. Author: Write at least 4 sentences about what you would most like the reader to think about as he or she reads your draft. This may include any concerns you have, difficulties you faced while writing this paper, and so on.

2. Reader: Keep in mind the author's comments as you read through the paper. Then, answer the following questions:
          a. Did the introduction provide enough information to preview the main purpose and structure of the paper? If so, how? If not, what pieces of information need to be added?
         b. Did the body paragraphs each have its own purpose within the paper? If so, how? If not, what are some global considerations that the author should keep in mind as he or she revises?
        c. Did the conclusion provide enough information to overview the main purpose and ideas within the paper? If so, how? If not, what pieces of information need to be added?
        d. Offer any final remarks, tips, encouraging words, and so on
« Last Edit: April 06, 2015, 04:25:37 PM by Yeonjae Lee »

Offline JonBair

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Re: Peer-Review
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2015, 02:42:20 PM »
I really, really like the assignment to the author.  I haven't seen anything like that before, but I think that it is really good to turn peer-review into a "two-way street" of conversation about the paper.  Often, peer-review becomes a checklist or a set of tasks for the students, but having that in there really seems promising for opening up the conversation.