Author Topic: Beginning Stages of Peer Review  (Read 1650 times)

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Offline MarthaFace

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Beginning Stages of Peer Review
« on: April 06, 2015, 10:57:27 PM »
Something I thought that might be interesting is, when students are just starting to do peer review,  might it be a good idea to do peer review on the peer review.   For example, after receiving their peer reviewed paper back and after making changes, they could answer questions like these:
What advice did you get that was most helpful?

What made it helpful?

What advice was not helpful?

What made it not helpful?
What did the peer review help you to improve?
What do you still need help with to improve?

The they could give this feedback back to their partner.  I think this kind of process might help to improve students intrinsic motivation to do peer review.  I think many times students just think of peer review as something they have to do and don't think about all the help it not only gives their fellow class mates but helps them in thinking about their own writing as well. This might help them not only to see that, but also to work on giving better feedback to their peers. 
« Last Edit: April 06, 2015, 11:01:57 PM by MarthaFace »

Offline Karesa

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Re: Beginning Stages of Peer Review
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2015, 01:14:49 PM »
This is a very good idea. One of the main complaints I've had with peer reviewing is that sometimes the feedback is useless, irrelevant, due to sloppy/fast reading, etc. Being able to point out things that are useful and encourage appropriate responses from your peers is a good way to develop good peer feedback skills.


To make this not entirely circular, the types of things that are valuable in peer feedback--evaluating internal coherence and logic, understanding the relationship between argument and support, etc are useful cognitive skills in addition to skills for this particular task. I think students often view these kinds of tasks as doing academic things for the sake of academia, which can really lower motivation. However, emphasizing the general applicability of these skills makes them more palatable.

Offline Muna

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Re: Beginning Stages of Peer Review
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2015, 01:17:31 PM »
This is interesting, and it led me to think if it would be better to ask students to do the peer review face-to-face in class. This way, the reader will be able to clarify his/ her suggestions to the writer, and at the same time, the writer will be able to ask questions and even ask for more input from the peer reviewer.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2015, 01:18:48 PM by Muna »

Offline Beth Carroll

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Re: Beginning Stages of Peer Review
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2015, 02:42:08 PM »
This is a really good idea. Another similar, good way to get students to think about how to provide better feedback would be to look as a class at peer review examples. Have students decide if the feedback is helpful and maybe have them practice making some changes according to the peer review as way to really see how applicable it could be. This could be done with this practice peer review you refer to.

Offline Kierski

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Re: Beginning Stages of Peer Review
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2015, 02:42:57 PM »
I really like the idea of a peer review of a peer review! I think it's always good for students to evaluate feedback (even teacher's feedback).

Offline catadelpilar

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Re: Beginning Stages of Peer Review
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2015, 02:45:06 PM »
I think it is a good idea to this kind of reflection assignment on the peer-review to see how students react to it and how useful they find it. I wonder if there is some way to ask them specifically about what kinds of revisions they are planning to make or have done depending on the suggestions received.