Author Topic: Give effective feedback in peer review  (Read 2888 times)

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Offline beiduo721

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Give effective feedback in peer review
« on: September 21, 2011, 09:07:14 PM »
 Although I have never taught academic writing before, I do want to share some ideas about peer review. As a language learner, I find it very helpful, both to the writer and to the one who contributes feedback. However, not many ESL/EFL students pay special attention to peer review. I discussed this issue with Jin, and she showed me some peer review samples from ESL writing classes. I have to say, the students are quite strict to their peers with comments such as Ēthis is wrong; itís not enough to support the main idea; I donít think soĒ etc.! We should let the students be aware of a proper way to provide effective feedback without hurting otherís feeling.

1.      Point out the good things first (the one you like or support). Praise, comment, and correct in that order.2.      Use complete sentences to provide clear explanations of your corrections. 3.      Make positive comments about topic sentences or thesis, examples, and conclusion. Be sure to comment on what you liked as well as what was not clear to you. 4.      Provide comments in clear handwriting if doing peer review with hardcopies. Here is a presentation about how to do peer review in writing class.
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/712/1/

Also, sometimes students lack motivation of correcting their classmateís work (sometimes they are just reluctant to criticize someone they know). As one possible solution, when I was in high school, we often did peer review among classes: we exchanged our assignments with the students from other classes and found it much easier to evaluate the strangerís work. Our teachers also made us compete with other classes to see who contributed more. We felt highly motivated and it worked so well. 
 

Offline hmehrte2

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Re: Give effective feedback in peer review
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2011, 08:21:13 PM »
I like the idea of exchanging papers with students in another class!  :D My students often complain that they don't want to critique their peer's work because they know them too well. Some have even told me that in their culture this seems wrong. I wonder how this would work? Would each class just exchange papers and have peer review on the same day? It's an interesting thought. I don't know how it'd go in the service courses but maybe if I teach somewhere in the future I could do it? Great idea!

Offline beiduo721

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Re: Give effective feedback in peer review
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2011, 09:37:12 PM »
I suggested this idea to Jin,who is teaching two ESL writing classes this semester and she actually tried it last week. She assigned each student with a partner from the other class and asked them to do peer review online using dropbox without knowing each other's personal information.According to her,it worked very well.Since students had no idea whose work they were dealing with, so they tried to be more objective and made lots of thoughtful comments.It can also solve the problem that some students may feel reluctant to comment on those who have better writing skills.

Offline hmehrte2

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Re: Give effective feedback in peer review
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2011, 07:53:41 PM »
That's such a great idea! Like Jin, I'm also teaching two classes so I think I'm gonna have to try this. :D

Offline kristinbouton

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Re: Give effective feedback in peer review
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2011, 12:48:14 AM »
That does sound like a great idea. Even as teachers, I have found that when we do calibrations among those who are teaching the same course - the grade of the teacher whose student it actually is is often a little higher than those of the teachers who don't know the student at all.