Author Topic: Great Peer Review Lesson  (Read 2129 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline nlloyd3

  • Norbert Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma Points! 17
    • View Profile
Great Peer Review Lesson
« on: March 29, 2012, 02:53:29 PM »
I used this lesson this semester in my advanced Freshman composition course and the students loved it. They are much more positive about peer review then my group last semester (as a result, I think :) It was developed by Kristin Bouton (IEI), Fall 2011 and adapted by Cassandra Rosado, Spring 2012. This is not the complete lesson, but what I adapted for a 50 minute class period.

First, I put students in groups of 4 and gave them 5-10 minutes to discuss the Feedback Discussion Questions handout. This is nice schema activation and got them engaged and interested in the topic. It also gives you a chance to address cynicism about peer feedback head-on. Then I passed out the Feedback Expressions handout and we went over it as a class. I made sure to read over it first and make some generalizations that I wanted them to find. For example, we could note that many modals and words like "maybe" are used to soften negative feedback. Finally, students were given the Feedback Role Plays handout. I shortened it to just two scenarios and had them first role play the wrong way, and then the right way. This made it lots of fun and a few of them demonstrated for the class.

On the actual peer review day I could then remind them to practice using phrases like "maybe you could...." and they seemed to enjoy it. These expressions are nice because they can be used in written or spoken form. Sometimes we don't realize that even when the peer review activity is primarily written, there is inevitably some verbal feedback, and this is key in not offending their classmates.

Offline yuhuiho2

  • Norbert Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma Points! 10
    • View Profile
Re: Great Peer Review Lesson
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2012, 12:44:14 PM »
I love it! The worksheets give the students good examples of using a proper language giving feedback to other students. Sometimes, the students don't really mean to use harsh words--they just don't know how to express it appropriately (maybe it has to do with the cultural differences). The samples can help the students to give kind and helpful feedback, and lessen the possibility of hurting someone's feeling.