Author Topic: Some Activities for Extensive Reading  (Read 1406 times)

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Offline Muna

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Some Activities for Extensive Reading
« on: February 07, 2015, 03:51:56 PM »
  http://www.robwaring.org/er/ER_info/activities_for_extensive_reading.htm
By clicking on the link above, you will find some ideas for extensive reading. I like the fact that the author considers the importance of knowing more about students' reading experiences, which might be different from one culture to another, and the different genres they are already familiar with. The author also points out some training steps that students might need in order to facilitate their own selection of books, such as sorting books according to their difficulty level. Although the author structures these activities in a very specific way: before reading, while reading, and after reading, I think familiarizing students with such a directed procedure would allow them to make the best use of their reading.

As for the before-reading activities, I totally agree that giving students some practice in making predictions before they read is likely to motivate them to read--in this case, they will have a purpose for the reading, which is to confirm or disconfirm their predictions.
The while-reading activities seem to be also effective; using the story web, the chain story, the plot log, and the vocabulary log would allow students to do something with a book they are reading. Although students might not need these activities as they become more familiar with speed-reading, I think these are good ideas to use with lower level students in order to enhance their understanding of any book. As for the after-reading activities, although asking students to reread a book might be useful in enhancing their understanding and their reading speed, it might turn out to be a boring activity, especially if students do not like the book. However, the other activities, such as writing a dialog, performing a skit or a role-play, reporting on a read book, talking about how a book relates to one's life, and creating a poster about a book are all good ideas to encourage students to read and to make their reading activity much more dynamic.   
 

 


 
 
« Last Edit: February 07, 2015, 03:54:34 PM by Muna »