Author Topic: Grammar Classroom Materials  (Read 2157 times)

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Offline Muna

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Grammar Classroom Materials
« on: February 21, 2015, 08:31:56 PM »


http://www.azargrammar.com/materials/index.html


This is a nice grammar website. You can find classroom materials developed by some teachers. These materials are divided up into three sections based on learners' proficiency level: beginning, intermediate, and advanced. Under each section, you will see teacher-created worksheets, expansion activities, vocabulary worksheets, song lessons, and power point supplements.

The teacher-created worksheets are organized according to specific grammar topics, and you can download them either in a word or pdf format. Under each topic you will also find several printable worksheets that include a variety of activities. Although most of these activities are mechanical, such as fill-in-the blank, sentence and question formation activities, I think they are still useful, particularly if you are introducing the grammatical structure for the first time. For me, I feel that I cannot exclude such activities from my classes as I found them helpful for students to, at least, get the gist of a grammar lesson. I also think that it is a useful way to familiarize students with the target grammar forms if you plan to move to more communicative tasks in a later stage.
     
Clicking on the expansion activities, you will find short lesson plans that give information about the materials you need for each lesson, description of the lesson, and some examples. Most of the ones I have checked involve communicative tasks, and they usually involve pair or group work, making them more dynamic. They also make use of authentic materials like objects, photos, ads, newspapers, situations, websites, songs, written lyrics, and short stories. I think these activities are very useful if you prefer to adopt communicative language teaching, or if you are in a stage where you need to move from grammar drills to more meaningful activities.

Vocabulary worksheets provide short vocabulary activities that help students expand their use of the target grammar structures. They include several activities that range from mechanical drills to communicative activities, such as "preparing a healthy dinner." I also noticed that some of these worksheets introduce vocabulary through reading activities, which is a good example of how different skills can be integrated in one class.

Song lessons give you the title of the song you can use to teach grammar, some background information about the song, grammar points, and vocabulary. This gives you a chance to decide the appropriateness of these songs for the context you are teaching in. You can always go ahead and listen to the song and see if it is culturally-approapriate before you use it. If you decide not to use these songs in class, you can also recommend them to your students.

PowerPoint supplements consist of lots of grammar presentations that you can use to help you explain or introduce grammar structures. Some of these presentations are well structured; they are organized, they don't include a lot of information, and they use a lot of illustrations, mainly through the use of pictures.
 
I would really recommend using this website, especially if you are teaching in a context where you do not have a particular grammar syllabus, and you would like to incorporate grammar into your classes. :) :)

 
« Last Edit: February 21, 2015, 08:38:57 PM by Muna »

Offline Randall Sadler

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Re: Grammar Classroom Materials
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2015, 12:44:21 PM »
Nice find!!!


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