Author Topic: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science  (Read 5622 times)

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Offline Randall Sadler

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Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« on: March 03, 2015, 12:24:30 PM »
Reply to this post and share your idea for Post-Reading Activities related to this article from Space.com: 
Ceres Science: NASA Probe to Study Dwarf Planet's Bright Spots and More
 
 http://www.space.com/28716-dwarf-planet-ceres-dawn-science.html
 
 In the Reading section of the forum you can also find Pre-Reading and During-Reading ideas for this article!!
« Last Edit: March 03, 2015, 12:25:13 PM by Randall Sadler »
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Offline kwingo

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2015, 03:20:34 PM »
WRITE AN ARTICLE ON YOUR OWN PLANET!

A subsurface ocean?? Ice volcanoes??? Gasses seeping from the interior???? (hehe)

Ceres is a pretty interesting place - and scientists are not done finding out about it!

What kind of planet would you like to discover?

You are going to write a short article (like the one we just read) on a recently discovered planet. Here is what you need to include:
  • Name of the planet
  • Features of the planet (where it is, how big it is, what it contains, what it looks like, etc.)
  • What scientists have discovered about the planet
  • What scientists are still searching for on the planet
  • Hypotheses about the planet from scientists

Offline dmack15

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2015, 08:49:46 AM »
  • Divide students into groups of 3.
  • Choose a leader for the group.
  • Have them write title/subject of the article in the middle of the page.
  • Beginning clockwise,  list 3-4 main ideas of the article on the right side of the page.
  • Beneath each of these, list one detail related to that idea.
  • They can then reread the article one more time.
  • Going clockwise on the left side of the page, list 3-4 future predictions of what you      believe will  happen after this information on Ceres is gathered.
  • Have each group leader share the group's ideas for a class discussion.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 08:52:04 AM by dmack15 »

Offline MarthaFace

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2015, 03:13:09 PM »
A very simple post reading task might be to ask students to write a paragraph about what they believe may happen in the future based on what they have read.  They should use points from the article to support their point.  Next you could give them another reading that has conflicting ideas and ask students to revise their paragraph based on the new information they learn.

Offline Yeonjae Lee

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2015, 03:20:35 PM »
After reading this article, students can respond to questions such as:

  • If Ceres is habitable, would you decide to live there? Why or why not?
  • Which planet would you choose to live on, and why?
  • What are some necessary resources/characteristics which make a planet or dwarf planet habitable?
Furthermore, students could conduct further research in order to answer these questions, though this does not have to be required.

Offline msfrank

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2015, 03:21:21 PM »
After reading the article, students should do the following tasks:

Summarize the article: ask students to write down the main points.

Evaluate the article: ask students to write a brief argumentative paragraph evaluating whether the mission is important to human kind and whether they think it is a good idea to invest in it.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 03:22:16 PM by msfrank »

Offline Kierski

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2015, 03:22:47 PM »
This post-reading activity organizes information presented in the article.


"There's something highly reflective on Ceres twinkling...and scientists hope to figure out what it is after the probe arrives at the dwarf planet later this week."

Instructions:

The article makes some hypotheses of what the "twinkling" may be. Underline in the article the possible explanations. Then draw diagrams for each of the explanations. (Hint: Look for words marking possibility to find the hypotheses.)





Possible explanations that students should draw.

"A meteorite could have created the crater and melted Ceres' underlying ice layer, causing the ice to vaporize..."
"It's also possible that the spots were caused by eruptions of ice volcanoes."
"Scientists are therefore on the lookout to see if Ceres has or ever had an underground ocean; cracks on the surface could be signs that material once burbled up from below."
"The mission team will also look for evidence of any gases seeping from the interior, which could make dust hover on the surface in the dwarf planet's low gravity."

Offline Yaqian Jiang

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2015, 04:31:25 PM »
post reading activity


In groups, discuss with your group members about the following questions:
  • What do you like most about this article?
  • [/size]What are some facts about Ceres?
  • [/size]What are the hypotheses in relations to Ceres? What are the supporting/refuting evidences for each hypothesis?
  • [/size]Can you draw a picture showing the approximate location of main asteroid belt, Mars, Jupiter, Ceres and Vesta from July 2011 through September 2012.   [/size]
  • [/size]If you are the writer, what you could do differently to improve this article? (Optional. If you want to make the lesson more geared toward writing, you may use this question.)
[/size]Group members: Yaqian(Jewel) Jiang, Fei-Chen Wen, [/size]Jihye Yoon, Jenna Suk

Offline Muna

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2015, 11:40:59 PM »
Some ideas for a post reading activity:
* You can connect this reading with a writing activity. Ask students to write a response to the whole text or they may choose an idea/ section and write a response  in which they might include:
1. their reaction to the text,
2. ideas they agree/ disagree with,
3. how it relates to other texts (how similar/ different it is from previous texts they have read),
4. what they found interesting, or any important details, 
5. what they would like to know more about.
* When students finish writing their responses, you might ask them to exchange their responses. In a further step, they might also respond to each other's responses.
* You might also ask students to write 2-3 questions while they are reading. After they finish reading, they discuss their questions in groups.
* Since the article points out some future investigation, you might ask students to discuss their predictions about any new findings about Ceres, particularly about the true nature of the bright spots. 
 
« Last Edit: March 06, 2015, 06:45:35 PM by Muna »

Offline ericxinliu

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Re: Post-reading activities for article on Ceres Science
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2015, 01:19:11 PM »
The teacher can divide students into several groups and ask them to talk about the information they get from reading the article. Then the teacher can ask the students in groups to relate the article to their personal experience (I mean, things they know about outer space exploration or exploitation) and share more ideas on whether the exploration on Ceres will benefit human beings (if yes, from aspects will it be beneficial to mankind). Afterwards, the teacher can ask the students to write a reflective essay as homework to talk about their reading and discussion in class.

Offline rcampillo

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Create your own Space Mission
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2015, 03:08:58 PM »
Have students create their own Space Mission. You can use NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab website to have students create their own space mission.
Here is the link to the website:http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/edu_game/
This website guides learners through the process of building their own mission:
  • Make your Scientist or Engineers (select a male or female charcters, hair length and color, eye type, size and color; choose cloth styles nad accessories)
  • Designing your lab by selecting three items from  a laptop, a camera, a microscope or a telescope. By the way, students can also select different colors for their working area.
  • Build your spacecraft: select between  an orbiter (travel to a planet and then circle it) or a rover (travel to a planet or moon and lands to move around the surface). Also, they can select how big (or small ) the spacecraft is.
  • Select 2 instruments to take into the spacecraft. If rover was selected, te options are a camera, a scoop/grinder, or a microscope. If an orbiter was selected, then the choices are a long-range camera, a spectrometer and a radar.
  • 5     After having the spacecraft ready, student need to select a destination: Mars, Saturn Jupiter, and Earth (for an orbiter) or Mars’ Equator, Mars’ North Pole, Saturn’s largest moon Titan, or Earth’s Moon ( for a rover)
  • Place the spacecraft into a Rocket and launch it to its destination.
  • Once in the destination,  collect data using the two different instruments they decided to take into their spacecrafts.
At the end, they can share their discoveries with a friend through email or even print out their space mission.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2015, 06:25:45 PM by rcampillo »