Author Topic: Online Graded Text Editor - text analyzer and editor  (Read 416 times)

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Offline brennaw

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Online Graded Text Editor - text analyzer and editor
« on: February 04, 2020, 11:23:42 AM »


https://www.er-central.com/ogte/

The website this link takes you to contains a lot of free resources in terms of graded readers, with both text and audio files available (and some quizzes I think!). They sort things into a lot of different proficiency levels, with estimates on how many words students of that level are expected to know.


That's useful on its own, but I think this particular tool on the site was most interesting to me. It serves a similar function to the other text analyzers pinned at the top of this forum, but with a few tweaks. It allows you to input a text, select a proficiency level, and then be given a) an estimate of how many words on average are outside the specified level and b) what the specific words are. Teachers can then decide whether or not to edit those words on the spot and run the check again.


Here's an example analyzing the first chapter of Harry Potter:



I think this could be useful in multiple ways. For one, if there is an authentic text that teachers feel may need slight adjustments, this is a good tool to help make choices about what needs to change. There are definitely mixed opinions about graded readers out there - it's possible that it might be better to start with an authentic text and then adjust. Even then, if you're looking to avoid graded readers, this can serve a similar function to other text analyzers to help find out if something is an appropriate level.


Especially for extensive reading, where you want to insure students are reading with just a couple words per page that are new to them to keep the focus on fluency, the percentage estimates that this tool give could be useful.


One potential caveat is definitely the quality of the word list the site is using. I couldn't find direct information about where the list comes from, but the site does specify that it continuously analyzes the exported, edited texts that teachers create, checking to see if the words that teachers change align with their word lists. That might help!
« Last Edit: February 04, 2020, 11:24:41 AM by brennaw »