Author Topic: peer review training  (Read 4513 times)

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Offline chang45

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peer review training
« on: September 27, 2008, 09:42:45 PM »
In my junior year, the teacher of the writing class asked the whole class to form three-people groups for peer review. For the whole school year, we had to give feedback to the other two group members' writing before turning them in to the teacher. Unfortunately, I found this peer review rather useless in my writing process and thought such activity a waste of time.

However, it seems that peer review has become a part of writing class here in the US and most writing teachers regard it as an important element in the class. So I started to wonder whether there are some underlying factors that make peer feedback a valuable in-class activity in ESL writing class, but not in EFL writing class.

I found three articles talking about adopting peer review in EFL writing classes: "Training students to become successful peer reviewers," "The effects of trained peer review on EFL students' revision types and writing quality," and "Review stances and writer perceptions in EFL peer review training," all by Hui-Tzu Min. One common suggestion among these three articles is that successful peer review needs training. Min offers examples such as "4-hour in-class demonstration and a 1-hour after-class reviewer-teacher conference" (118, 2006).

In cultures where peer review is not a common practice in class, I believe that merely offering peer review sheet and then asking students to give feedback on peers' writing is not enough. Students will be able to understand better what and how they are supposed to do in giving feedback if they have training beforehand. Only when students can give feedback would their feedback become a resource for writers in revision or re-drafting. What happened to my peer review before was that those peer feedbacks were either unclear or too general; as a result, I didn't pay much attention to neither peer review activity nor the feedbacks I received. I especially like Min's using reviewer-teacher conference: It is a good way for reviewers to clarify their feedbacks and for teachers to know whether those feedbacks are appropriate.

I just think that if we put so much focus on peer review, we should make sure the feedbacks students give to each other can help writers in their writing process.

PS Attached are the three articles I mentioned by Hui-Tzu Min. Take a look if your are interested. ^_^

Offline Qishu Liu

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Re: peer review training
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2008, 10:13:29 AM »
Thanks for your materials in peer review!!I will use it in my practice day :notworthy

Offline Francine

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Re: peer review training
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2008, 12:18:28 AM »
To Ya-Chun,

I agree with your idea that successful peer review needs training and only when meaningful feedback is given in peer review activites will they really benefit students writing.

I'm here to suggest another way to make this activity more effective. What about peer editing? Will students make more efforts in giving feedback when they have to edit their peer's work, and be assessed on that, perhaps?


 :?don'tknow
« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 11:28:58 PM by Francine »
May health and happiness be with you always.

Offline ngocluuly

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Re: peer review training
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2010, 06:33:01 AM »
thanks a lot for the 3 attached articles. I'm conducting a research related to peer review training, so the articles are invaluable to me. thanks a million!