Author Topic: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher  (Read 6571 times)

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Offline Imogenius

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Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« on: October 15, 2009, 10:53:05 AM »
These are rubrics I've used for Peer and Teacher feedback on 1) an argument paragraph, 2) a summary paragraph.  The first rubric was developed by LuAnn Sorenson, my supervisor, and I modified it slightly.  The second one I developed based on materials used to teach the skill of writing article summaries.

I find rubrics really help peer feedback sessions because students have to answer specific questions about their peers' writing.  Most of these rubrics are modifications of a list of good characteristics of an assignment that students were asked to submit, so they were taught these before they had to write.  

Peer Feedback rubrics are now posted for editing thesis statements, a first draft of an argument synthesis, and an analysis paper.

Hope these are helpful!
Imy :)
« Last Edit: November 10, 2009, 10:12:33 AM by Imogenius »
Imy Berry
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Offline juvalracelis

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Re: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2009, 01:07:51 PM »
I like this rubric, and I am actually using it for my paragraph assignment.  One thing I am adding is a section on grammar/mechanics.

Offline Imogenius

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Re: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2009, 09:05:27 AM »
I wanted to, but LuAnn, my supervisor, has told me to move away from grammar editing in the peer feedback process.  Do you think this has more or less of a role based on the level of the class?
« Last Edit: October 29, 2009, 09:15:23 AM by Imogenius »
Imy Berry
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Offline juvalracelis

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Re: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2009, 09:52:21 AM »
I think it does have to do with the level of the class.  For the class I'm teaching, we also have Grammar benchmarks that we are targeting.  For their final portfolio, they have to reflect on their grammar (and I love grammar) so I try to incorporate it in many of my rubrics.

Offline Imogenius

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Re: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2009, 10:13:59 AM »
I just added my analysis rubric.  A question I have is, should different categories be weighted differently in final scores?  How would that division occur?  How would I weight each category?
Imy Berry
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Offline soohyun

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Re: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2009, 07:18:49 PM »
Imy, I think your rubric is detailed and user-friendly
Teachers can easily grade assignments by using your rubrics.
I have alternative set of rubrics for summary and critique assignment.
I got this from ESL507 class, Dr. Bishop.
They are relatively laid back and generic.
But I think it was a good rubric for students to refer back to their work
before submitting it, because it reminded them of whether they are on the right
track or not.

Offline luvjanny

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Re: Rubrics Used for Feedback, Peer and Teacher
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2010, 01:00:33 PM »
I liked the rubrics. I actually modified the 3rd rubric (argument ppr) for one of my classes.
While modifying my rubric, I found it important that wording was also important since the students have to understand the rubric. In other words, I think it should be student-friendly.

In doing so, students appeared more engaged in providing peer review, since they could easily grasp what the objective was.
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