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Post-reading activities on "Oddball giant white dwarf...."

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Randall Sadler:
Post your Post-Reading Activities for the article "Oddball giant white dwarf may have formed in epic crash of smaller stars" here.  Simply "reply" to this post to make your contribution rather than starting a new topic. These are based on this article: [/size]https://www.space.com/weird-massive-white-dwarf-formed-by-star-crash.html. Find Pre-Reading and During-Reading activities for this article in the corresponding sections of the forum!!

hannahp:
Students after reading this article can choose another topic, maybe it was another concept mentioned in the article or something relating to space and/or stars, and they can create a short presentation or write a short article similar to this one about their concept they chose.

rbora2:
Post-reading:

* Students will group up to draw a white dwarf star on a poster board labeling all of the different parts of the star.
* The idea would be to summarize the main parts of the article such as:
* What the star is made of
* Different chemical layers
* Weight
* Location in space
* Students will conduct a peer review on their group members.
* At the end of class each group will present their poster to the class.

hveitch2:
Post-Reading:
1. Design a poster with a small group. Write down 3 new facts you learn about dwarf stars, make a diagram of a regular white dwarf star versus the "oddball" dwarf star. Include an internet print-out picture!
2. Visit the UIUC planetarium and listen to the various presentations about astronomy and the life cycle of stars.

Timothy Jang:
Timothy, Hannah, and Eunjeong

* Writing prompt to help students assimilate the information in the article with their personal experiences.
* Ask students: When did you see something strange and need to figure out what had happened?
* Field TRIP to the University of Illinois observatory and look the them starrrsss
"You never expect to see the hydrogen and carbon mixed together in a white dwarf - there should be a layer of helium keeping them separated," Hollands said. "That was really strange and very surprising and raised the big question of how that might have happened."

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