General Resources --Scroll down to see "Reading" and "Writing" Resources-- > Getting to Know You Activities

A Long List of Icebreakers

(1/1)

agreenf2:
Introduction Hot Potato
Explain that whoever has the ball gets to ask a question and toss the ball to a classmate, who answers the question about themselves. For example, if you start with the ball you could ask "What is your favorite movie?" and toss the ball to whomever you want to answer. After answering, the second student asks a question and throws the ball to another classmate.

Marooned
Establish a collaborative, cooperative learning environment on the first day of school with Marooned. Place students into groups of five and tell them that they are stranded on a deserted island. Explain that they must select five items from their personal belongings to help them survive and that each member of their group must contribute one thing. Give them about ten minutes to dig through their book bags, purses, or pockets to select necessary items. Then, have each group stand and explain what they selected and how each object is essential to their survival.

Two Truths and a Lie
Here’s any easy way to do that: once gathered, have everyone come up with two things that are true about themselves and another thing that's false. Then have each person present what they came up with.
Everyone tries to guess the right answer, which leads to stories about past life experiences and facilitates engaging and enjoyable conversation.
 
Find 10 things in common
Task groups with finding 10 things that all of them share in common (besides the obvious, e.g., that they are human). You might find out that a bizarre number of employees have all been to Keokuk, Iowa even though your office is based on the West Coast.

Whodunit
Split up your employees into groups (or pairs if you have a small company).
Have each person write down something interesting they've done on a note card (e.g. skydiving, have lived in ten different states, drank a gallon of milk in five minutes — the sillier the better).
Put the note cards into a hat, give it a nice shake, and have each person drawn a note card they will then read aloud.
The reader must then try to guess "who done it" and why they came to that conclusion.

The Personality Quiz Icebreaker
Make sure everyone has their smartphones. (We doubt this will be a problem.) Send everyone a link to a personality quiz you think they would like. Since there are probably over a million quizzes circulating, we know there will be one to pique your interest.
Everyone can take the quiz and then reveal their results to the group. Have everyone explain why they agree or disagree with the results.

The Movie Pitch Icebreaker
Split people into groups and have each group come up with a movie they want to make. Everyone should have a short pitch prepared within 10 minutes. (This film is The Avengers meets My Little Pony.)
Let everyone make their pitch, and then have all meeting attendees vote on which idea deserves “funding.” The winners won’t immediately move to pre-production, but they might get a healthy snack for their creativity.

Speed “Dating” Icebreaker
Have everyone sit near people they don’t work with. Tell everyone to look to their right and announce that they’ll be spending the next 5 minutes speed networking with the person next to them. The goal: 5 conversations in 5 minutes. Set a timer; every time the buzzer goes off, it’s time for people to find a new conversational partner.

The Instagram Icebreaker
To conduct this idea from William Joseph, just give employees a few minutes to scroll through their Instagram photos and pick a snapshot they want to share with the group. They can share the photo and explain why they picked it. This will help some personality shine through, especially if people on your team need to get to know each other. If you were looking for some team icebreakers – this would be the one.

The Friendly Debate Icebreaker
Use this student-centric icebreaker idea from the Cult of Pedagogy in your next meeting.
Start out by posing a harmless question that prompts people to choose a side. Here are some examples:
•   Which food is better: pizza or tacos?
•   Would you rather go on a hike or to a movie?
•   What skill is more valuable: creativity or logic?
•   Which is worse: being bored or being too busy?
Have everyone physically divide into sides—pro pizza to the right; pro taco to the left. Let all the like-minded people discuss the virtues of their position for awhile, and then have a representative try to sell the other side of the room.
This will give everyone a chance to see things from different perspectives. It will open everyone’s minds for a productive meeting.

Never Have I Ever
Everyone holds up five fingers. Students take turns saying one thing that they have not done. For example, I have never gone skiing. Any student who has done the activity (who has gone skiing) puts one finger down. Whoever puts down all their fingers is out.
Who am I?

Place a Post-It note with the name of a famous person on the forehead of each person. Everyone must discover the name of the person on their forehead by asking their classmates yes/no questions.

What’s Your Theme Song?
Ask the team to imagine they’re in a movie. What song would play when they walk into a scene? Would it be a rousing number like in Rocky or maybe something more somber? You can use that information throughout the project to, say, play music when a milestone has been completed.

Paper Airplane Game
I love this icebreaker because it is more hands-on. Pass out different colored sheets of paper to each person attending the meeting. Then ask everyone to write an interesting fact about themselves on the piece of paper and fold it into a paper airplane. Then everyone launches their paper airplane to somewhere around the room. Then everyone retrieves one of the paper airplanes, reads the fact, and guesses whose paper airplane they got. It’s fun to guess and you learn new things about each other.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

Go to full version